Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Light Bulbs

I am glad Canada has delayed the foolish light bulb ban until 2014. Hopefully we will eliminate the ban totally before 2014. We should have the choice of what light bulbs to use. We will be getting a steady stream of Americans coming here on light bulb tourism. A good piece by Peter Foster.


I have always found CFL lights harsh, unattractive and annoying. I discovered this week that my aversion might be more than a psychological quirk attached to skepticism about "settled" climate science and distinctly unsettled climate policy. In a recent edition of a U.S. publication called The Energy Advocate, editor Howard Hayden, emeritus professor of physics at the University of Connecticut, points out that while incandescent bulbs are "notoriously inefficient, emitting less than 10% of the input power as visible light," they are visually pleasing because they emit light similar to the light from the sun, that covers the "entire wavelength range visible to the human eye." Professor Hayden notes that the problem with fluorescent lamps is that their light is not a continuous spectrum. Thus they distort colours. To put it less scientifically, they are hard on the eyes, and harder on older and more damaged eyes in particular.

Dr. Mary Lou Jackson, director of the Vision Rehabilitation Center at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary in the Harvard Department of Ophthalmology, told me some people with damaged vision actually prefer CFLs. However, many do not. The important thing, she said, is to have the choice.

When Canadian light bulb legislation was amended in April to delay banning those "inefficient" incandescent bulbs until 2014, press reports suggested the then-minority Conservative government had done so "quietly." Perhaps that was so as not to enrage environmental NGOs or suggest to Washington that Ottawa was daring to walk out of eco-goosestep, thus inviting trade sanctions.

9 comments:

bertie said...

You left out the most important fact..They are dangerous to your health and to the environment.They contain mercury.Unlike ordinary round bulbs that you discard in the regular garbage,these environmental monstrosities are dangerous when broken and you have a lot of rules to follow to dispose of them.Whoever dream,t up these things should be jailed.They are 10 times more dangerous than the original ones we use and are worse on the environment..So why are we being forced into using them????

Leeky Sweek said...

As a pianist,I cannot use one of those spiral CFL bulbs as my piano light. The light temperature is too harsh.

Fred from BC said...

They also don't work when used in outdoor fixtures if the temperature drops below zero. And speaking of temperature, most of Canada can be considered a 'cold-weather' country for much of the year, which means that the heat produced by incandescent lamps isn't really wasted and will have to be produced by other means if your entire house is illuminated by CFLs...

Anonymous said...

I Don't understand people that say CFL bulbs don't give off any heat. Try grabbing on to one that's been running for a while. They get really hot, almost as hot as a regular bulb.

Anonymous said...

Also they do work outside in sub zero temps too. They might take a few minutes to come up to full brightness but they do work fine after that. The mercury thing is bad though. Hopefully they can find a way to make them mercury free soon.

Bert said...

incandescentlightbulbs are pretty close to 100% efficient. Of course, most of the energy they emit is in the form of heat, but so what ?. I can't stand those CF bulbs. I broke one in my shop. Swept it up and kept going.

Fred from BC said...

Don't understand people that say CFL bulbs don't give off any heat. Try grabbing on to one that's been running for a while. They get really hot, almost as hot as a regular bulb.

They get nowhere near as hot as an incandescent, sorry. And you're talking about retained heat rather than radiated heat, which is the real issue here (the thermal masses are quite different).

Fred from BC said...

Also they do work outside in sub zero temps too. They might take a few minutes to come up to full brightness but they do work fine after that.


No they don't. Only if the temperature is close to zero will they come up, to *near* full brightness; it it's well below zero (or there is any wind chill) they may not light at all, and if they do it will be minutes later and a fraction of the regular brightness. There is a reason that all CFLs have a temperature range printed on them (or on package they come in) by law.





The mercury thing is bad though. Hopefully they can find a way to make them mercury free soon.

10:43 PM

Anonymous said...

I have extensively covered the light bulb regulations and why they are wrong, with research and references
on http://ceolas.net

RE Canada see for example http://ceolas.net/#li11x

RE CFL issues http://ceolas.net/#li15cfx

Peter

I Support Lord Black